Jorge luis borges blindness essay summary

Borges's father died in 1938, shortly before his 64th birthday. On Christmas Eve that year, Borges suffered a severe head injury; during treatment, he nearly died of septicemia . While recovering from the accident, Borges began playing with a new style of writing for which he would become famous. His first story written after his accident, " Pierre Menard, Author of the Quixote ", came out in May 1939. One of his most famous works, "Menard", examines the nature of authorship, as well as the relationship between an author and his historical context. His first collection of short stories, El jardín de senderos que se bifurcan ( The Garden of Forking Paths ), appeared in 1941, composed mostly of works previously published in Sur . [8]

Nearing both 70 years of age and total blindness, Borges nonetheless gives a virtuosically wide-ranging series of talks, freely reaching across forms, countries, eras, and languages without the aid of notes. Entitled "This Craft of Verse," these lectures ostensibly deal with poetry. Alas, like many literary geeks, I know too little of poetry, but if Borges can't motivate you to learn more, who can? And if you've read any of his fictions, you'll know that he treats all subjects as nexuses of subjects. To hear Borges speak on poetry is, in this case, to hear him speak on storytelling, cliché, the epic, human communication, the shortcomings of the novel, translation, and the falseness of happy endings — and, because nobody could digest it all the first time, to want to hear it again.

We really like Jorge Luis Borges. The erudite Argentine writer was simply brilliant, weaving words into amazing, transcendent, magical stories. And it turns out there is another reason beyond his writings to like him. For when Borges' Nazi-loving opponents tried to discredit him by saying that he was Jewish, he put out an essay entitled "I, Jew". Well, that title turned out to be a bit misleading. In that essay, Borges stated that he is not Jewish, and presented his actual genealogy. With that said, he added that he would have been proud to be Jew. And now we like him even more. Verdict: Sadly, not a Jew . May 27, 2010

Borges was reluctant to authorise a translation. In his preface to the 1954 edition, Borges distanced himself somewhat from the book, which he gave as an example of the baroque , "when art flaunts and squanders its resources"; he wrote that the stories are "the irresponsible sport of a shy sort of man who could not bring himself to write short stories, and so amused himself by changing and distorting (sometimes without aesthetic justification) the stories of other men" and that "there is nothing beneath all the storm and the lightning."

Jorge luis borges blindness essay summary

jorge luis borges blindness essay summary

Borges was reluctant to authorise a translation. In his preface to the 1954 edition, Borges distanced himself somewhat from the book, which he gave as an example of the baroque , "when art flaunts and squanders its resources"; he wrote that the stories are "the irresponsible sport of a shy sort of man who could not bring himself to write short stories, and so amused himself by changing and distorting (sometimes without aesthetic justification) the stories of other men" and that "there is nothing beneath all the storm and the lightning."

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