Gwen harwood a valediction essay

As "Walter Lehmann", Harwood demonstrates two ironic registers in In the Park and Home of Mercy . On the impersonation level there is the counter-intuitive role of profound male insight into frazzled mothers and the institutional life of "ruined girls". On the level of content and language there is the anti-Madonna, almost blasphemous private utterance – "They have eaten me alive". And ironic "mercy", within constraints of neatness, smoothness, daylight, plaster saints and prayer, is juxtaposed with sin, ripening bodies, burning memories, soiled sheets, and the "brutish vigour" of wrestling angels in night dreams.

Gwen harwood a valediction essay

gwen harwood a valediction essay

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