Australian separation of powers essay

“Separation of Church and State” means that the government cannot force its citizens to violate their own religious conscience, but it certainly does not mean that Christians should stay out of politics. Exactly the opposite is true. Christians have an obligation to ensure that Australian freedoms are maintained.  If a Christian minister is told that he or she must perform the marriage of a same-sex couple – that is violation of the separation of Church and State. The State must not impose its values upon your faith. When a Muslim or Christian bakery is told that it must violate the owner’s religious beliefs by providing a cake for a same-sex wedding – that is violation of the separation of Church and State. When the radical Safe-Schools ideology is introduced into schools without parents’ consent or parents’ knowledge, that is violation of the separation of Church and State.

As the Australian system of Government is based on a federal system, it incorporates features from both Britain and the United States. Therefore, the Australian Constitution provides for a Westminster-type Parliament - the Sovereign, an Upper House (Senate) and a Lower House (House of Representatives) with an Executive consisting of elected Members of Parliament. The Senate, however, like its United States counterpart, is representative of the States, with the High Court, similar to the United States Supreme Court, as the judicial interpreter of the Australian Constitution and the Federal Government's legislation. 

Australian separation of powers essay

australian separation of powers essay

Media:

australian separation of powers essayaustralian separation of powers essayaustralian separation of powers essayaustralian separation of powers essay