Architecture contemporary essay in landscape

From the architects:  “The hardest part of the task set before us was to “catch” the style and proportions of the great architect Wright. One of the fundamental principles of Wright’s architecture is “pressed” by the roof volume of the house, because of which it seems that the floor height is low, and the house has a pronounced horizontal composition.
The second principle is a huge take-out from the front of the roof, which gives a hint of traditional Japanese architecture. The third principle is a large number of covered terraces, which are also stretched by the construction site. According to the flat nature of the relief and the active vertical vegetation, style Wright particularly good “fit” in the area for development. Special attention was attended to functional zoning and building layout. Almost all planning is overflow of the interior spaces with outside covered terraces and landscape.
The house consist of hall, dining room, kitchen, office, guest bedrooms and two covered terraces on the ground floor. And 3 bedrooms with bathrooms and an open terrace on the second floor. Also there is indoor parking, which successfully “played” up in the composite solution. The facade is made of hand-modeled clinker, limestone and natural wood. The roof covered with copper. Window system is 106 wooden profile and double-glass.
The whole landscape is worked out with reference to the small Japanese gardens.”

The dominant figure in the rise of modernism in France was Charles-Édouard Jeanneret, a Swiss-French architect who in 1920 took the name Le Corbusier . In 1920 he co-founded a journal called ' L'Espirit Nouveau and energetically promoted architecture that was functional, pure, and free of any decoration or historical associations. He was also a passionate advocate of a new urbanism, based on planned cities. In 1922 he presented a design of a city for three million people, whose inhabitants lived in identical sixty-story tall skyscrapers surrounded by open parkland. He designed modular houses, which would be mass-produced on the same plan and assembled into apartment blocks, neighborhoods and cities. In 1923 he published "Toward an Architecture", with his famous slogan, "a house is a machine for living in." [22] He tirelessly promoted his ideas through slogans, articles, books, conferences, and participation in Expositions.

“I was looking for a way to deal with the humanizing qualities of decoration without doing it. I got angry with it—all the historical stuff, the pastiche. I said to myself, If you have to go backward, why not go back 300 million years before man, to fish? And that’s when I started with this fish shtick, as I think of it, and started drawing the damn things, and I realized that they were architectural, conveying motion even when they were not moving. I don’t like to portray it to other people as a complicated intellectual endeavor. Most architects avoid double curves, as I did, because we didn’t have a language for translation into a building that was viable and economical. I think the study of fish allowed me to create a kind of personal language.” 

Architecture contemporary essay in landscape

architecture contemporary essay in landscape

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